fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info
fotojournalismus:

Jonathan May: La Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)
Artist’s statement:
"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”
(via likeafieldmouse)
Zoom Info

fotojournalismus:

Jonathan MayLa Vie, L’Amour, La Mort (2012)

Artist’s statement:

"Mauritania is considered to be one of the least visited places in the world. The country’s only real exposure to photography is through journalism, and unfortunately after many Al-Qaeda kidnappings of tourists the media has ruined any potential travelers’ plans by painting it as an extremely dangerous place to visit. This in turn makes photography in the country extremely difficult. Journalists spreading fear have ruined the tourism industry, and many people’s livelihoods.

Chinguetti, established in the 13th century as a trans-Saharan trade route is considered to be the 7th holiest city of Islam. Sunni pilgrims en route to Mecca gathered here annually to trade, gossip, and say their prayers in the mosque built from stone. Desert caravans were the source of Chinguetti’s economic prosperity, with as many as 30,000 camels gathering there at the same time. The animals, which took refreshment at the oasis retreat, carried wool, barley, dates and millet to the south and returned with ivory, ostrich feathers, gold and slaves.

Today’s Chinguetti is a shadow of the prosperous metropolis it once was, and with the tourism industry basically dead the town and a lot of its workers have fled to larger cities like Nouakchott to survive.

When drinking tea with a nomad in the desert you must drink three glasses: the first glass is for life, the second glass is for love, and the third glass is for death.”

(via likeafieldmouse)

I will not be returning to Ferguson

abbyjean:

I had been on the ground helping Al Jazeera America cover the protests and unrest in Ferguson, Mo., since this all started last week. After what I saw last night, I will not be returning. The behavior and number of journalists there is so appalling, that I cannot in good conscience continue to be a part of the spectacle.

Things I’ve seen:

-Cameramen yelling at residents in public meetings for standing in way of their cameras

-Cameramen yelling at community leaders for stepping away from podium microphones to better talk to residents

-TV crews making small talk and laughing at the spot where Mike Brown was killed, as residents prayed, mourned

-A TV crew of a to-be-left-unnamed major cable network taking pieces out of a Ferguson business retaining wall to weigh down their tent

-Another major TV network renting out a gated parking lot for their one camera, not letting people in. Safely reporting the news on the other side of a tall fence.

-Journalists making the story about them

-National news correspondents glossing over the context and depth of this story, focusing instead on the sexy images of tear gas, rubber bullets, etc.

-One reporter who, last night, said he came to Ferguson as a “networking opportunity.” He later asked me to take a picture of him with Anderson Cooper. 

One anecdote that stands out: as the TV cameras were doing their live shots in front of the one burnt-out building in the three-block stretch of “Ground Zero,” around the corner was a community food/goods drive. I heard one resident say: “Where are the cameras? I’m going to go see if I can find some people to film this.”

Last night a frustrated resident confronted me when he saw my camera: “Yall are down here photographing US, but who gets paid?!”